2022

Recognizing components is key to fighting extremist violence: Anita Hill

Heller in the News
September 28, 2022

Anita Hill talks with Alex Wagner on MSNBC about how societal ills like misogyny, racism, and homophobia exist as components of extremist violence and need to be addressed holistically to effectively right extremism.

‘Making overdose crisis more severe’: Concerns over animal tranquilizer growing in Massachusetts

Heller in the News
September 27, 2022

“We’re trying to track the xylazine as it shifts throughout the state to help prepare community programs and people who use drugs to better equip themselves to stay safe,” said Traci Green with the Brandeis Opioid Policy Research Collaborative, according to Boston25News.

"There's still so much to go": Attorney and professor Anita Hill on the fight against gender violence

Heller in the News
September 27, 2022

On CBS News, Anita Hill says the country has made "some progress" when it comes to combating gender violence since her landmark sexual harassment testimony to Congress, but "there's still so much to go."

Fascism Resurges in Its Original Homeland

Heller in the News
September 26, 2022

The election of a far-right coalition in Italy with a neofascist, Giorgia Meloni, as likely prime minister is even more alarming for what it portends for the rest of Europe, wrote Robert Kuttner for The American Prospect.

Schools in Los Angeles Will Carry Opioid Antidote After Increase in Overdoses: 'An Urgent Crisis'

Heller in the News
September 26, 2022

According to PEOPLE, Schools in Los Angeles will now be equipped with a medication to reverse opioid overdoses in response to several recent fentanyl-related overdoses among students. Also, Traci Green, a professor and director of the Opioid Policy Research Collective at Brandeis University, told PEOPLE that "Fentanyl ha[d] reached into communities where it hadn't ever been before."

Column: The fast-food industry gears up to kill another pro-worker state law

Heller in the News
September 23, 2022

David Weil's book, "The Fissured Workplace," is mentioned in a column in the Los Angeles Times on the fast-food industry wages and workplace conditions.

Today is International Day of Peace. Can you measure what peace is?

Heller in the News
September 21, 2022

In the Washington Post, Pamina Firchow writes about the ways that people measure peace around the world, including how safe they feel going about in their daily lives.

Screaming in Secret: Dahlia Lithwick on the Women Who Work Within the Legal System

Heller in the News
September 20, 2022

Dahlia Lithwick, for the Literature Hub, shares that Anita Hill believes women have a special relationship with the justice system because it is something they can navigate. In an interview, she asked Hill whether and when it was appropriate to give up on the legal system, to walk away and claim that it was a force for more harm than good. Anita Hill answered: “Without law, it’s chaos, right? Because we will lose. We will lose with chaos. We will always lose.”

SAMRIDH Healthcare Blended Finance Facility Wins P3 Impact Award

Heller in the News
September 20, 2022

A.K. Nandakumar helped USAID India establish the first Blended Finance Facility for Pandemic Response in the world. It recently received the state department's P3 Impact Award, notes Concordia.

Federal Student Loan Forgiveness Calls Attention to Other Debt Relief Programs

Heller in the News
September 19, 2022

According to Insight Into Diversity, black student borrowers see a disproportionate debt burden. A 2019 study estimated that Black students who began college in the 1995-1996 academic year still owed 95 percent of their original debt. The study, “Stalling Dreams: How Student Debt is Disrupting Life Chances and Widening the Racial Wealth Gap,” was conducted by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University.

Worker shortages are fueling America’s biggest labor crises

Heller in the News
September 16, 2022

Lisa Lynch talks to the Washington Post about how employment has fallen in sectors like nursing homes, local schools, and railroads, and how an increase in labor action and strike activity indicates that people are tired and overworked.

A Child's Neighborhood Can Affect How Often They Visit The Emergency Room

Heller in the News
September 16, 2022

According to Moms.com, a new study that uses Child Opportunity Index scores has revealed that a child’s neighborhood can influence how often they visit the local emergency room.

Biden could expand overtime for millions

Heller in the News
September 15, 2022

According to the Daily Kos, David Weil, a professor at Brandeis University, is confident that the administration can deliver. What’s key, he says, is to reach out to all the stakeholders—from employers and the business lobby to unions and worker advocates—throughout the process. “You can do it in a way that protects more workers and is legally defensible and economically sustainable.”

Anita Hill on the fight to end gender-based violence

Heller in the News
September 13, 2022

Women's rights advocate Anita Hill will be the keynote speaker at the YWCA Seattle, according to King5.

Americans turning to ‘modern layaway’ to afford basics

Heller in the News
September 12, 2022

Researchers at Brandeis University, like Abby Walters, found that 35% of American families do not meet the “basic family needs budget” — the amount needed to afford rent, food, transportation, medical care and minimal household expenses — despite working full-time year-round, according to News Nation Now.

Lower-Opportunity Neighborhoods Tied to More Pediatric ED Visits

Heller in the News
September 12, 2022

KOAM shares that Children from neighborhoods with a low Child Opportunity Index (COI) have higher emergency department use overall, and particularly more visits that could be managed in primary care, according to a study.

Expanded Safety Net Drives Sharp Drop in Child Poverty

Heller in the News
September 11, 2022

According to the New York Times child poverty fell by 59 percent from 1993 to 2019, according to a comprehensive new analysis that shows the critical role of increased government aid. “This decline in child poverty is very significant. I cannot say it enough,” said Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, a poverty expert at Brandeis University who reviewed the data.

More than a third of working families can’t afford basic needs: study

Heller in the News
September 07, 2022

The New York Post shares that a study by researchers at Brandeis University’s diversitydatakids.org program shows that 35% of American families with full-time jobs cannot afford the basics.

'Full-time work doesn't pay': Why are so many working American families living day to day?

Heller in the News
September 06, 2022

USA Today quotes a recent report from researchers at Brandeis University’s diversitydatakids.org program at the Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy that explains that more than one-third of U.S. families that work full time year-round do not earn enough to cover a basic family budget.

California Governor Signs Bill to Regulate Fast-Food Industry

Heller in the News
September 05, 2022

“There are large number of workers in general who are less likely to complain — that means you need to have government play a larger role than it would in other cases,” said David Weil, who under oversaw the agency that enforces the federal minimum wage under President Barack Obama, shares The New York Times.

The Surprisingly Disappointing Reign of Marty Walsh, Biden’s Labor Secretary

Heller in the News
September 05, 2022

A writer from The New Republic explains that David Weil, Biden’s first choice to run the wage and hour division, lost his Senate confirmation vote because Senators Kyrsten Sinema, Mark Kelly, and Joe Manchin wouldn’t support him. That was a huge setback. But part of a Cabinet secretary’s job is to get his nominees through the Senate, and (in Weil’s case) to pull them if they don’t have the votes to confirm.

Gig Workers Tire of Waiting for Action From Biden’s White House

Heller in the News
September 02, 2022

According to The New York Times, David Weil said gig platforms like Uber and Lyft were eroding labor protections. “I was and am concerned about the creep of this idea that if you do it through a platform, that somehow puts magic fairy dust on work and transforms people from employees to independent contractors,” he said.

Neighborhood Characteristics Affect How Often a Child Visits Emergency Department

Heller in the News
September 01, 2022

Children living in neighborhoods with greater hardships, such as substandard housing or high pollution, are more likely to use emergency departments (EDs), including for complaints that could be managed by their pediatricians, a new study led by UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals found. For this study, researchers used the Pediatric Health Information Systems to look at the association between ED visits from 2018 to 2019 in children up to 17 years old and their Child Opportunity Index (COI) scores.

Biden administration looks to expand overtime for millions of Americans

Heller in the News
September 01, 2022

According to Visalia Times Delta, during David Weil’s confirmation hearings, the gig companies’ advocacy group App-Based Work Alliance pushed out tweets claiming that Weil supported an “outdated workforce model” that was rejected by gig workers who “love their flexibility and independence.”

Biden Could Expand Overtime for Millions

Heller in the News
September 01, 2022

In Capital and Main, David Weil says the battle for the Labor Department to increase the salary cap this fall could be more intense than the previous attempt during the Obama administration.

As Employers Gain Leverage, Attys Brace for Wage Impact

Heller in the News
August 30, 2022

In Law360, David Weil talks about how the softening of the labor market means the upward push on wages and other conditions diminishes.

California Senate Passes Bill to Regulate Fast-Food Industry

Heller in the News
August 29, 2022

David Weil talks to the New York Times about how raising minimum wage for fast-food workers could increase wages for workers in other sectors, but that new standards in the fast-food industry could draw resources away from enforcement of labor and employment laws in other industries with equally vulnerable workers.

The BBJ's 2022 Executive Education guide

Heller in the News
August 25, 2022

Heller's Executive MBA for Physicians program and other executive-education programs have been highlighted in the Boston Business Journal's 2022 Executive Education guide.

What’s a Pell grant? Here’s what you need to know

Heller in the News
August 25, 2022

A study by the Institute for Economic and Racial Equality (formerly the Institute on Assets and Social Policy) on the racial inequality of student debt is cited in a CNN article on Pell grants.

An animal tranquilizer has made it into the illicit drug supply, increasing the number of overdoses

Heller in the News
August 19, 2022

According to Legal Reader, the drug is being found in illicit opioids, including fentanyl, and in cocaine. When mixed into these substances, it can slow breathing and be life-threatening. “We’ve seen an exponential increase during the pandemic,” said Traci Green, who oversees MADDS and directs the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University. “Now the sad thing is we’re really seeing it all over the state. It’s definitely hazardous.”

A Methane Fee Won’t Work If It Doesn’t Count All the Methane

Heller in the News
August 16, 2022

Robert Hitt, MPP'23, wrote a piece for The American Prospect in which he questions the effectivity of the Inflation Reduction Act’s energy measures because it only covers 40 percent of the methane emissions produced by the oil and gas industry, and the companies that are covered report their own emissions.

TechTank Podcast Episode 50: How does tech policy fall short in protecting people with disabilities?

Heller in the News
August 08, 2022

Henry Claypool, Technology Policy Consultant for the American Association for People with Disabilities and National Policy Expert at the Brandeis University Heller School for Social Policy and Management’s Community Living Policy Center, is a guest on Brookings' The TechTank Podcast, where he discussed how people with disabilities are affected by existing technology, while looking into necessary legislation and protection to rectify these wrongs.

This Simple Habit Is the Biggest Predictor of Your Child’s Chances for Success

Heller in the News
August 05, 2022

According to SciTech Daily, a study presented at SLEEP 2022 found that a community’s sleep health is the most important health predictor of children’s chances for success and positive growth. Researchers combined data from the Child Opportunity Index, which provides indices for education, health, and environment, as well as social and economic resources and conditions that affect children’s development, with neighborhood sleep health data gathered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

126 Top Economists: Inflation Reduction Act “Will Fight Inflation and Lower Costs”

Heller in the News
August 02, 2022

In a blog post on the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi's website, David Weil and Lisa Lynch are listed as two top economists who sent a letter to Congressional leaders urging swift passage of the Inflation Reduction Act.

The Pioneering Feminist Who Won Glamour's Woman Of The Year Lifetime Achievement Award

Heller in the News
August 01, 2022

For over 30 years, Glamour has been honoring role-model-worthy women in its Women of the Year awards. The List shares that Anita Hill was responsible for presenting the award. Hill had also been honored by the magazine 20 years earlier, when her addition to Glamour's "Women of the Year" issue literally stopped the presses. But this time, Hill was honoring Gloria Steinem, saying, "A new generation is discovering this remarkable woman."

The Dark Side of Solar: The Story Behind The Solar Panel

Heller in the News
August 01, 2022

Abigail Despres, MPP/MBA'23, wrote a blog post for the Solstice Initiative where she explained the downsides of the usage of solar panels. She elucidates that since the cost of solar panels has dropped nearly 70% since 2014, production and use of solar energy have become increasingly popular, with the solar market projected to be valued at $202.5 billion by 2026.

Biden Puts Forward New Wage Chief Nominee

Heller in the News
July 28, 2022

David Weil, who Biden had initially nominated to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, called Jessica Looman "a highly qualified nominee," reports Law360.

Public education advocates want Nashville to be known as a great place for kids, not just tourists

Heller in the News
July 28, 2022

WPLN shares that, in Nashville, with rising housing costs, many families lack access to a sustainable place to live and good wages. Kids who do grow up in communities with access to those things are more likely to grow into healthy and productive adults, according to children’s research program diversitydatakids.org.

Mark Cuban’s pharmacy startup is actually making drugs less expensive—but experts say it's solving the wrong problem

Heller in the News
July 28, 2022

Cindy Thomas, a health policy professor at Brandeis University, says she's "pleased" to see what the pharmacy is doing, according to CNBC. It serves a large swath of Americans who still need generic drugs, and it's particularly helpful to people who are uninsured, underinsured or on high-deductible insurance plans, she says.

Right-wingers are upset because Kamala Harris described what she was wearing

Heller in the News
July 27, 2022

Robyn Powell, PhD'20, had a tweet quoted in an article by Indy100 where she expresses her validation and support towards the vice president for describing herself and promote inclusion.

‘Never just black and white’: End of Roe a health risk for disabled, advocates warn

Heller in the News
July 25, 2022

Blanket bans on abortion would be another loss of bodily autonomy for the sexually active disabled population, which faces higher health risks from pregnancy, according to Tampa Bay Times. That population has a higher rate of unplanned pregnancies and less access to contraception, sex education and reproductive health care, said Monika Mitra, an associate professor at Brandeis University and director of the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy.

People with disabilities weigh medication, pregnancy in post-Roe world

Heller in the News
July 25, 2022

After the Supreme Court struck down federal abortion protections, people with disabilities are considering the risks of pregnancy while taking medications that could harm a fetus, according to The Washington Post. Some states with abortion bans make exceptions if the mother’s life is at stake. But Robyn Powell, the legal scholar, said she anticipates that physicians will be “very hesitant” to perform abortions where they are criminalized or restricted.

Zach Bronstein Tries to Make Crypto Available to Charities and Businesses

Heller in the News
July 22, 2022

Zach Bronstein, age 32, runs Endaoment, a public charity that allows individuals and companies to receive charitable gifts. The big clincher? Those gifts can be doled out in the form of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and Ethereum, according to Live Bitcoin News.

5 observations at the end of the HPC’s Altman years

Heller in the News
July 20, 2022

The ”Altman Years” came to an end at the last meeting of the Health Policy Commission when chairman Stuart Altman, a professor at Brandeis, stepped down after 10 years at the helm. The meeting raised five interesting issues, according to CommonWealth.

Changing this tax credit could further reduce child poverty

Heller in the News
July 18, 2022

Yahoo! shares how key adjustments to the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) could help lift millions of children out of poverty in the U.S., according to a new study, especially helping Hispanic children and children in immigrant families. Increasing the EITC benefits by 40% and dropping the Social Security number requirement would lift 2.09 million children from poverty, according to a study led by diversitydatakids.org, an initiative of Brandeis University.

Workers Divide on Contractor Status, Complicating Biden Approach

Heller in the News
July 14, 2022

Workers across various industries are divided on what approach the government should take when it comes to determining who should be an independent contractor or an employee under federal labor law, a gap that complicates the Biden administration’s efforts to combat worker misclassification, according to Bloomberg Law. “There were certain professions that have been kind of gray areas, and you know, they look sometimes like independent contractors and sometimes employees,” which “is why we have laws and judges,” said Obama administration Wage and Hour Division chief David Weil.

Column: Big business goes after another Biden appointee for doing his job, which is protecting consumers

Heller in the News
July 14, 2022

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce really piled on the sinister adjectives when it announced its campaign against financial regulator Rohit Chopra two weeks ago, according to LA Times. Also last year, the chamber and other industry lobbies attacked David Weil, a labor law expert at Brandeis and a former Labor Department official.

Anita Hill: Business leaders must commit fully to diversity ‘for the sake of their own longevity’

Heller in the News
July 14, 2022

"Two years ago, companies set ambitious goals that clearly proclaimed their willingness to address inequalities," Anita Hill explains. "However, the work is not complete."

Altman leaving Health Policy Commission

Heller in the News
July 13, 2022

Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday appointed retired health care executive Deborah Devaux as chair of the Health Policy Commission, replacing Stuart Altman, who has chaired the agency since its creation 10 years ago, explains the Commonwealth Magazine.

First-ever chair of state's Health Policy Commission to step down

Heller in the News
July 13, 2022

“With sadness but a sense of satisfaction, I want to indicate that this will be my last meeting as the chair. “This has been an incredible opportunity for me,” Altman said at the HPC’s July 13 meeting. “It’s time and I need to step down. But I do that with such a sense of accomplishment. It’s been such a pleasure to work with you, my fellow commissioners.”

Anita Hill On The Supreme Court Overturning Roe And Where The Country Goes From Here

Heller in the News
July 11, 2022

When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, eliminating the constitutional right to abortion in the United States, in June, Anita Hill wasn’t shocked. Instead, it was more of a dreaded confirmation, explains Elle.

Black Women’s Student Debt ‘Double Whammy’: Twice as Likely to Owe More Than $50K, Have Decreased Savings

Heller in the News
July 07, 2022

The Washington Informer mentions that student debt remains a stubborn obstacle that prevents Black Americans from securing financial stability in the short term and financial wealth in the long term. According to The Institute on Assets and Social Policy (now the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity), after 20 years in repayment, the typical Black borrower still owes 95% of their cumulative borrowing total, while similarly situated white borrowers have reduced their debt by 94% — with nearly half of white borrowers holding no student debt at all.

How the Democrats forgot the new deal and paved the way for Trumpism

Heller in the News
July 01, 2022

In Robert Kuttner's new book, “Going Big: FDR’s Legacy, Biden’s New Deal, and the Struggle to Save Democracy,” he explains how we got to our present political inflection point, how high the stakes are, and what comes next.

Technology is failing women of color. How can we address its blind spot and reverse the rising maternal mortality?

Heller in the News
July 01, 2022

Despite global efforts to improve health and wellbeing, the rates of maternal deaths among women of color continue to soar, with over 810 women dying every day globally. In developed countries like the United States, COVID-19 pandemic has unveiled that women of color pay an unacceptably high price, whereby the deaths of black women remain more than twice the national average, explains New Times.

Concern staffing shortage could hinder launch of new suicide hotline 988

Heller in the News
July 01, 2022

Danna Mauch, PhD'90, is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health, inc. She has been following the implementation of the new 988 crisis hotline, and is cautiously optimistic about the hotline launch in July. She has heard that the State of Massachusetts has been unable to fill all the positions they are trying to recruit for this important job, shares Boston 25 News.

Anita Hill issues dire warning: Expect stronger restrictions on reproductive rights in coming years

Heller in the News
June 30, 2022

Anita Hill, now a professor at Brandeis University and the author of the book “Believing,” joins MSNBC’s Ari Melber to discuss SCOTUS and the state of women’s rights in America.

Anita Hill: ‘There's probably plenty of evidence of conflict of interest’ for Justice Thomas

Heller in the News
June 29, 2022

Anita Hill, lawyer and professor at Brandeis University, joins Andrea Mitchell with her reaction to the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and to discuss Justice Clarence Thomas’ wife Ginni’s controversial political activism. “There's probably plenty of evidence of conflict of interest,” says Hill. “There need to be in place some systems for requiring a recusal when there is an obvious conflict or a semblance of conflict.”

Not just fun and games, Hasbro part of growing list of companies who say they're focused on social impact

Heller in the News
June 28, 2022

Sazia Nowshin, MBA/MA SID'22 is quoted in a WBUR article about Hasbro and similar companies who focus on social impact.

Graduate student sees overturning of Roe v. Wade as potential interruption of women's life plans

Heller in the News
June 28, 2022

Incoming MPP student Anna Ardelean talks about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and how an unplanned pregnancy would affect her.

Zach Bronstein, 32, champion of cryptocurrency philanthropy

Heller in the News
June 28, 2022

Zach Bronstein, MBA'16, MA'16, the chief operating officer of Endaoment, was selected as one of the New York Jewish Week’s 36 to Watch. In Jewish Telegraphic Agency, he talks about his work in cryptocurrency philanthropy.

Q & A: Meet Habiba Braimah, PhD candidate

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

Habiba Braimah is a PhD candidate and director of the Brandeis Intercultural Center.

Summer 2022 Heller Magazine: Letter from the Interim Dean

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

“I am eager to continue guiding our community along the pathways begun under Dean Weil’s leadership.”

Jessica Sanon, MBA'18: One of the BOLD 9: Brandeis' annual list of up-and-coming recent alumni

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

In spring 2022, Brandeis recognized Jessica Sanon, MBA'18, on its annual BOLD 9 list, which honors up-and-coming recent alumni who are fostering change, thought leadership and social impact.

Matthew Brookner, MPP/MA'13, PhD'21: Digging into the data

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

As an associate research scientist at Brandeis University’s Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies, Matthew Brookner, MPP/MA’13, PhD’21, knows his way around data.

Mariama Khan, MA SID'08: Becoming a cultural scholar

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

In her latest book, “Politics in The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau: Precolonial Influence on the Postcolonial State,” Mariama Khan, MA SID'08, explores how the culture and traditions of the precolonial Kaabu empire have been used to shape political rhetoric in both countries throughout history.

Lang Le, MPP'10: Bringing the Affordable Care Act from theory to practice

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

Lang Le, MPP'10, discusses his work at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, where he helps bring the Affordable Care Act from theory to practice.

The Politics Behind the Lens

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

PhD candidate Teresa Kroeger’s research lens illuminates her perspective as a professional photographer.

Children in Crisis

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

Dr. Ilan Schwartz, EMBA’21, established the award-winning Child Psychiatry Short Stay Service to ease pressure on Massachusetts’ strained care system

The Power of Storytelling

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

Economist and professor Lisa Lynch, P’17, H’17, helps students make sense of an economy and labor market unlike any other.

Fabric of Change

Heller News Release
June 23, 2022

Ambreen Khan, MA SID’19, fosters economic empowerment for artisan women from Pakistan to Texas in an increasingly competitive marketplace.

10 Reasons Why The Biden Administration Must Provide Student Loan Debt Relief For Black Americans

Heller in the News
June 23, 2022

“Twenty years after college, the median debt of white students has reduced by 94% — with almost half having no student debt — but Black borrowers at the median still owe 95 percent of their total debt,” according to the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity (formerly Institute on Assets and Social Policy).

Dr. Andrew Kolodny Appointed President of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing

Heller in the News
June 21, 2022

Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP) has appointed Dr. Andrew Kolodny to succeed Dr. Jane Ballantyne as the organization’s next president. The appointment will become effective June 21, 2022.

Report: Low-income renters can’t afford rent in nearly 45% of America’s largest metro areas

Heller in the News
June 16, 2022

The Child Opportunity Index (COI) measures and maps neighborhood resources and conditions, like safe streets and parks, considered important to healthy child development. For Black families, this rises to over 80% of affordable neighborhoods.

"History says democracy will die if Democrats don't try 'going big'

Heller in the News
June 13, 2022

Robert Kuttner warns Biden’s presidency may be the “heartbreaking interregnum between two bouts of deepening American fascism.”

The Segal Program Moves Its Operations to IERE in Summer 2022

Heller News Release
June 09, 2022

The Heller School is pleased to announce that the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity will be the new home of the Eli J. & Phyllis N. Segal Citizen Leadership Program, beginning this summer.

Delving beyond tenuous links between mental illness, mass shootings

Heller in the News
June 07, 2022

Joseph Wronka contributes his opinion to a series of letters in the Boston Globe. He states that there's a problem with systemic violence and racism among young adults contributing to recent mass shootings.

Healthy sleep predicts opportunities for children to succeed

Heller in the News
June 07, 2022

A new study using data from the Child Opportunity Index found that sleep health was the biggest predictor of opportunity for children, impacting scores for education, health and environment, and social and economic development.

LERA 2022 Award Recipients

Heller in the News
June 03, 2022

Lisa Lynch was awarded the Labor and Employment Relations Association Lifetime Achievement Award in June, 2022.

New Research Spotlight: How to solve political conflicts when conspiracy theories are tied to social identity

Heller News Release
June 02, 2022

In a new study published in the Journal of Deliberative Democracy, Graham Wright, MPP’15, PhD’16, argues that using a deliberative approach based on co-creation can be more productive for resolving conflicts closely connected to social identities.

The Texas elementary school shooting and overturn of Roe v. Wade are ‘absolutely’ connected, says Anita Hill

Heller in the News
May 27, 2022

In an interview for Fortune, Anita Hill explains how the tragic elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas and the expected overturn of Roe v. Wade are connected.

The Fast Food Industry Runs on Wage Theft

Heller in the News
May 26, 2022

The New Republic quotes David Weil talking about the gray zone inherent in the franchise-corporate relationship and the murky labor practices the industry has adopted to fill the pay gap—a phenomenon he called “fissured employment.”

Nonprofits Fighting Gender Violence Have Struggled Since Losing Buffetts’ Funding. They Urgently Need More Support

Heller in the News
May 26, 2022

This profound lack of dedicated, consistent support puts anti-violence service providers in a precarious position and needs to change. Addressing the problem requires substantial resources, including providing lifesaving shelter, counseling, legal assistance, emergency food and clothing, job training, and advocacy.

Reducing Barriers to NP Value-Based Care

Heller in the News
May 24, 2022

On the American Nurses Association website, the Heller School has partnered with Boston College and the American Advanced Practice Network to reduce barriers to value-based payment arrangements for NP-owned practices. Monica O'Reilly-Jacob, PhD'18, is quoted speaking about the project.

Heller Celebrates Commencement in Person for the First Time in Three Years

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Heller held its first in-person diploma ceremony in three years for its class of 2022 graduates on Sunday, May 22. The graduates — 195 master’s degree recipients from 2022 and 41 doctoral degree recipients from 2020, 2021 and 2022 — represent seven programs and more than 40 countries, speaking over 35 languages.

MPP Commencement Speaker: Adam Jones ’15, MPP’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the Master of Public Policy program, Adam Jones, ’15, MPP’22, talked about how he has benefited not just from his coursework and internship, but also the surprise lessons he learned from his peers throughout their collective journey. He is a recipient of the Frieze Fellowship and the Eli J. & Phyllis N. Segal Citizen Leadership Fellowship.

MBA Commencement Speaker: Zari Havercome ’16, MBA/MA SID’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the Social Impact MBA program, Zari Havercome ’16, MA SID/MBA’22, talked about the lessons her parents taught her and the importance of thinking from as many angles and perspectives as possible. She is also a recipient of the Sillerman Fellowship.

MS Commencement Speaker: Christianah Adeoya, MS GHPM’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the MS in Global Health Policy and Management program, Christianah Adeoya, MS GHPM’22, talked about deciding to pursue a graduate education in the middle of a pandemic and her hopes for the future of health care systems.

SID Commencement Speaker: Olivier Ishimwe, MA SID’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the MA in Sustainable International Development program, Olivier Ishimwe, MA SID’22, shared his experience working with youth in Rwanda and said his time at Heller helped him learn how to create sustainable solutions for education and unemployment.

EMBA Commencement Speaker: June Roberts, EMBA’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the Executive MBA for Physicians program, June Roberts, EMBA’22, said she values Heller’s commitment to equity, inclusion and diversity, and encouraged her fellow graduates to continue to be involved in social impact activities.

COEX Commencement Speaker: Jan Afza Sarwari, MA SID/COEX’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the MA in Conflict Resolution and Coexistence program, Jan Afza Sarwari, MA SID/COEX’22, shared her experience growing up in Afghanistan and having to attend a secret school for girls, as well as what she hopes to bring back to her home country as a Fulbright Scholar.

PhD Commencement Speaker: Olawale Olaleye, PhD’22

Heller News Release
May 22, 2022

Representing the PhD in Social Policy program, Olawale Olaleye, PhD’22, shared what it was like coming from Nigeria and finding a supportive community at Heller.

What labor shortage? Some retailers now say they're overstaffed.

Heller in the News
May 20, 2022

According to Marketplace, COVID-19 has changed trends in retail, and some companies report being overstaffed as a result. The issue, notes David Weil, is that many of these positions are part-time, and won't fulfill workers' desires for stability and growth opportunities.

Democrats, the Midterm Jinx Is Not Inevitable

Heller in the News
May 20, 2022

Robert Kuttner shares his opinions in an article for The New York Times about the so-called "midterm jinx" that Democrats face this coming November. Though many experts predict that Democrats will lose both the Senate and the House, Kuttner outlines the ways to avoid this outcome

Column: Big business musters more lies to smear a Biden nominee because she would do her job

Heller in the News
May 19, 2022

According to Los Angeles Times, in April, David Weil withdrew as a candidate to lead the Department of Labor's wage and hour division after pressure from big business. Gigi Sohn faces similar pressure from business as a candidate for the Federal Communications Commission.

10 Heller Students Selected for Prestigious Fellowship Programs

Heller News Release
May 18, 2022

The Harvard Kennedy School Rappaport Public Policy Fellowship, the Boren Awards, and the Eli J. & Phyllis N. Segal Citizen Leadership Program will all welcome Heller students for their 2022 fellowship cohorts.

Anita Hill Wins 2022 Silver Gavel Award for Book

Heller in the News
May 18, 2022

The American Bar Association has awarded Anita Hill a 2022 Silver Gavel Award for "Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence."

Major Metropolitan Areas Pricing Out Black Americans

Heller in the News
May 18, 2022

At the onset of the pandemic, there wasn’t a single state, region, or county in America where a full-time worker earning the minimum wage could afford a two-bedroom rental home, and nearly half of Black and Latinx renters (and more than a third of all renters) were paying unaffordable rent, according to The Washington Informer.

Anita Hill, the Optimist: Overcoming the Undoing of Roe v. Wade Is Possible 'by Pulling Together,' Hill Says

Heller in the News
May 18, 2022

Decades after she testified opposing the confirmation of then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, Anita Hill remains ever hopeful in the power of speaking out and what can be accomplished when society says "we want something better. We want more" according to Inside Edition.

Nicole Rodriguez Named President of New Jersey Policy Perspective

Heller in the News
May 17, 2022

The Board of Trustees of New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP), a Trenton-based think tank that drives policy change to advance economic, social, and racial justice, announced today that Nicole Rodriguez, from Brandeis University (MPP'14), will be the organization’s next President.

Fireside Chat: A Conversation with Dean David Weil and Interim Dean Maria Madison

Heller News Release
May 13, 2022

On Wednesday, May 4, the Heller community held a fireside chat where Dean David Weil passed the baton to incoming Interim Dean Maria Madison.

Person Place Thing with law professor Anita Hill

Heller in the News
May 13, 2022

In an interview for WAMC, Anita Hill explains how sexual harassment derived from civil rights law. “There was the sense that, OK, now we’ve tackled one area of equality, we’ve prevailed to some extent, let’s build on it.” One right leads to another. Or used to. In ancient days.

Why Anita Hill wants us to take the long view on the Supreme Court

Heller in the News
May 13, 2022

“The Supreme Court is only as good as the people who are on it,” said Anita Hill, Brandeis University's professor, for a Vox interview.

How would $10,000 in student loan debt forgiveness impact BIPOC borrowers?

Heller in the News
May 10, 2022

According to Prism Reports, a move from the White House to forgive $10,000 in student loan debt would erase student loan debt for millions, though critics think more should be done to unburden BIPOC borrowers.

Breaking Barriers: Live Red Foundation Introduces Multisport to Youth

Heller in the News
May 10, 2022

Using the Child Opportunity Index, the Live Red Foundation identified communities where children could benefit from multisport and endurance sports.

Cheap Grace

Heller in the News
May 09, 2022

In The American Prospect, Robert Kuttner talks about Harvard University's recent pledge to spend $100 million toward a “Legacy of Slavery Fund.”

Black Kids From Poorer Neighborhoods Hit Hardest by DKA Readmissions | MedPage Today

Heller in the News
May 06, 2022

According to Medpage Today, a new study found that Black children with type 1 diabetes are at a greater risk of being readmitted for diabetic ketoacidosis when compared with White and Hispanic children of similar opportunity levels.

The ‘Great Resignation’: What's really going on behind the scenes?

Heller in the News
May 04, 2022

Economics professor and author of A Fissured Workplace, David Weil, argues that the gig economy has resulted in declining wages, eroding benefits, inadequate health and safety conditions, and ever-widening income inequality for society as a whole. Eroding job conditions and employee protections did not create resilience in the labour market: it made it more fractured and fragile.

Revenge Politics Takes Newer Forms in Pakistan

Heller in the News
May 03, 2022

Pakistani security forces use tactics like forced disappearances to quell dissenters in the Balochistan province, according to the International Policy Digest.

A new crop of podcasts to challenge conspiracies, unpack history and set the record straight

Heller in the News
May 02, 2022

30 years ago, Anita Hill shared her story of sexual harassment before an all white, mostly male, middle-aged U.S. Senate. But she was not alone. There was another witness who came forward to back her up, but was never heard from at Judge Clarence Thomas' confirmation hearing, according to CBC.

Florida opioid trial testimony; Walgreens said DEA bullied them, lobbied to fight back

Heller in the News
May 02, 2022

Dr. Andrew Kolodny quoted in the Florida Record regarding Walgreens' involvement in the Florida opioid crisis.

Anita Hill: To prevent sexual harassment at work, leaders should empower bystanders to help

Heller in the News
April 29, 2022

In Fortune, Anita Hill writes about the importance of empowering people to properly challenge abusive behavior in the workplace to create more accountability and safety.

Column: Senate’s rejection of a Labor Department nominee is horrible news for American workers

Heller in the News
April 27, 2022

David Weil is interviewed in the Los Angeles Times about his nomination as head of the Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division, the confirmation battle, and his views on what needed — and still needs — to be done.

At Greenwich function, Anita Hill blasts Republican treatment of Ketanji Brown Jackson

Heller in the News
April 25, 2022

At a recent event, WSHU reports, Anita Hill said she was not surprised by the Republican attempt to discredit Jackson, but there has been some progress made in the 30 years since she accused Justice Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment during his 1991 confirmation hearing.

Watch: Does Elizabeth Warren have the influence to help Democrats avoid a midterm blowout?

Heller in the News
April 22, 2022

Robert Kuttner appears as a guest on WGBH's Talking Politics to discuss whether Elizabeth Warren has enough clout in the Democratic party to affect real change.

White House will push ‘harm reduction’ in latest fight against drug overdoses

Heller in the News
April 21, 2022

In an interview for PBS, Andrew Kolodny, from Brandeis University, talks about how the number of deaths from drug overdoses are spiking.

Expert: No medical reason to explain 'enormous' uptick in WV Opioid scripts

Heller in the News
April 18, 2022

Andrew Kolodny, medical director of Opioid Policy Research at Brandeis University, was called by the state as an expert witness in the case last Thursday, according to the Charleston Gazette-Mail.

Maria Madison Appointed Interim Dean of the Heller School

Heller News Release
April 15, 2022

Madison, the school’s associate dean for equity, inclusion and diversity and director of the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity, will succeed Dean David Weil on July 1, 2022.

State raises health care cost growth benchmark, citing Covid-19

Heller in the News
April 13, 2022

In an interview for the Boston Business Journal, Stuart Altman, chair of the HPC, said that while he's concerned about rising costs and understands that the commission has to keep its foot on the brake to lower prices. However, he didn't want to leave the health care system harmed after the pandemic.

Fentanyl Pills Are Driving a Drug Overdose Spike Among U.S. High Schoolers

Heller in the News
April 13, 2022

In an article for Everyday Health, Andrew Kolodny, MD, the medical director of Opioid policy research at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, explains that overdose deaths among teenagers are due to experimentation and casual or occasional use.

A Worrisome Drop In The Number Of Young Nurses

Heller in the News
April 13, 2022

Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, the supply of RNs is under threat. New data covering the entirety of 2021 show the total supply of RNs decreased by more than 100,000 in one year—a far more significant drop than ever observed over the past four decades, according to Health Affairs.

Ex-Biden Wage Chief Pick Talks 'Shock' Of Senate Vote

Heller in the News
April 13, 2022

In Law360, David Weil talks about how he hadn't expected a Senate majority to block a motion to advance his nomination to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division.

Student loan debt has a lasting effect on Black borrowers, despite the latest freeze in payments

Heller in the News
April 11, 2022

PBS explains that according to a 2019 report by the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity (formerly Institute on Assets and Social Policy, or IASP), twenty years after starting college, white borrowers' median student debt fell to 6 percent. In contrast, the median Black borrower still owed 95 percent of their loan.

Anita Hill Saw History Repeat Itself at Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Supreme Court Hearings

Heller in the News
April 08, 2022

Anita Hill wasn’t surprised that there was an attack on Ketanji Brown Jackson. “I was shocked at the level—or the depths that they would go to—to discredit her,” she says in an interview for The New Yorker.

Private Sector Power Players: Somalia’s Energy Sector is Ready for Investment

Heller in the News
April 08, 2022

In a blog for RTI International, Abdishakur Ahmed, SID'20, explains that global investors are often hesitant to invest in Somalia, deeming it too risky due to security concerns, political instability, and ambiguous business regulations. While this is, in part, justifiable given the East African nation’s last 30 tumultuous years, the future looks bright for private investment in energy in Somalia.

Opinion: Anita Hill: The Senate Judiciary Committee mistreated Judge Jackson. I should know.

Heller in the News
April 07, 2022

Anita Hill writes for the Washington Post that the shameful spectacle of the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson makes it clear that the confirmation process is broken and the panel must act to restore people’s faith in it.

Anita Hill calls Ketanji Brown Jackson confirmation an 'important cultural moment'

Heller in the News
April 07, 2022

In an interview for CNN, Brandeis University professor Anita Hill said Thursday that Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation to the US Supreme Court marked an "important cultural moment" for the court and the country.

The Rewards of Work: Lessons from the Fair Labor Standards Act

Heller in the News
April 07, 2022

David Weil gives the opening remarks at a webinar hosted by Aspen Institute on the lessons from the Fair Labor Standards Act.

2022 Heller Awards Recognize Excellence in Our Community

Heller News Release
April 06, 2022

Each spring, the Heller School recognizes outstanding service in teaching, mentoring, teaching assistance, staff service, research, and equity, inclusion and diversity.

How companies can support women with childcare initiatives

Heller in the News
April 05, 2022

Fast Company explains that according to the Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy at Brandeis University, in 2018, childcare was unaffordable for 63% of full-time working parents.

Powell discusses #FreeBritney and disability rights

Heller in the News
April 03, 2022

In Mississippi State University's student newspaper, The Reflector, Robyn Powell, PhD'20, was a guest speaker at an online event entitled "#FreeBritney: Achieving Reproductive Justice for all Disabled People" as part of Mississippi State University's gender studies program.

David Weil’s Defeat on the Senate Floor Is an Outrage

Heller in the News
March 31, 2022

The New Republic writes that the Democratic Senate voting not to advance the nomination of David Weil is a loss for the rights of working people.

Black and Hispanic people are more likely to be denied mortgage loans in Boston

Heller in the News
March 30, 2022

Tatjana Meschede, associate director of the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity at Brandeis University, is quoted in an article for WBUR, where she explains that homeownership is one of the major drivers of the racial wealth gap.

The Heller School once again named a top 10 graduate school

Heller News Release
March 29, 2022

U.S. News & World Report ranks Heller among the best schools in the nation in two public affairs specialty categories: social policy, and health policy and management.

Child Opportunity Index helps hospitals target community programs

Heller in the News
March 29, 2022

The index, which provides details for 72,000 neighborhoods nationwide, is proving to be a useful tool in identifying factors that impact children’s health, according to Health Data Management.

More T diversions coming, what about Zone 1A reform?

Heller in the News
March 28, 2022

Corinne Thomas, MPP'23 from Brandeis University, explains that parts of Boston deserve lower commuter rail fares.

Mass. drug courts settle with US Attorney's Office over interfering with treatment

Heller in the News
March 25, 2022

Dr. Andrew Kolodny, the medical director for the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management, was quoted by a GBH News article concerning drug use for specific treatment plans, including which medication to take.

Biden, Harris take aim at bias in home appraisals: 'Owning a home ... means a shot at a better future'

Heller in the News
March 23, 2022

Eliminating racial disparities in the amount of wealth families gained from owning a home could close the wealth gap between white and Black households, and white and Latino households, according to the think tank Demos and the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity at Brandeis University, explains an article from Spectrum News.

Book by Anita Hill is among 29 finalists for ABA Silver Gavel Awards

Heller in the News
March 18, 2022

A book by Anita Hill is among 29 finalists for the ABA’s 2022 Silver Gavel Awards for Media and the Arts.

Heller Launches Undergraduate Research Fellows Program

Heller News Release
March 14, 2022

In spring 2022 Heller launched a competitive fellows program for five Brandeis undergraduate students to work with mentors in the school’s 10 research centers and institutes.

'Hidden discrimination': California university joins national trend to protect against caste bias on campus

Heller in the News
March 14, 2022

Rajesh Sampath and Laurence Simon are quoted in WGBH speaking about how caste in America has been a hidden discrimination for a long time.

What Could Bring SCOTUS Back From the Brink? Anita Hill Weighs In

Heller in the News
March 14, 2022

Anita Hill, Brandeis University’s professor, appeared on Slate’s Amicus podcast. She appeared on the podcast to discuss history-making confirmation hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson. This is a historic moment for American jurisprudence: the president seeks to confirm the first Black woman to the US Supreme Court. Professor Hill spoke about the possibility of these hearings restoring the declining legitimacy of the high court. She also talked about how ideas about judicial objectivity and neutrality are mired in racist and sexist views about how judges think.

Yale strikes Sackler name from campus amid Opioid outrage

Heller in the News
March 11, 2022

AP News quotes Dr. Andrew Kolodny, who is a critic of Purdue and the Sacklers, has testified against the company in court, and leads a program on Opioid policy at Brandeis University.

Caste Protections Are a Civil Rights Win, but Be Ready for Backlash

Heller in the News
March 08, 2022

Brandeis University is among the pioneering higher education institutions implementing caste protections over the last two years. Fortunately, the number of institutions is growing, according to Inside Higher Ed.

Without Giving In, a United West Needs to Offer Putin a Face-Saving Way Out | Opinion

Heller in the News
March 07, 2022

Adjunct lecturer Eugene B. Kogan, GSAS PhD'13, has written an opinion piece for Newsweek in which he argues that what's needed is for the United West to translate the military defense and economic punishment into an opening for negotiations with Putin.

Women’s Rights Scholar and Acclaimed Author Anita Hill to Keynote Benefit for Fairfield County’s Community Foundation’s Fund for Women & Girls Luncheon

Heller in the News
March 03, 2022

Anita Hill will be this year’s keynote speaker for the Fairfield County’s Community Foundation’s (FCCF) annual celebration for its Fund for Women & Girls.

Heller-led teams sweep at Brandeis’ largest start-up pitch competition

Heller News Release
March 02, 2022

Five teams of Heller students competed in this year’s SparkTank, all winning prizes for their social venture concepts

Neighborhood Factors Tied to Delayed Presentation for Pediatric Appendicitis

Heller in the News
March 02, 2022

Patients living in neighborhoods with very low Child Opportunity Index (COI) scores had higher odds of presenting complicated appendicitis, according to Health Day.

Anita Hill: Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Nomination to the Supreme Court Signals Historic Change

Heller in the News
February 28, 2022

Anita Hill, professor at Brandeis University, writes about what it means for a Black woman to serve on the Supreme Court in article for URL-Media.

Anita Hill reacts to Ketanji Brown Jackson's Supreme Court nomination

Heller in the News
February 26, 2022

Professor Anita Hill explains to CNN's Anderson Cooper why Ketanji Brown Jackson's Supreme Court nomination is a step in the right direction for diversity in the high court

Anita Hill Takes On Those 'Trying to Put Black Women in a Box'

Heller in the News
February 24, 2022

In an interview for The New York Times, Kara Swisher talks with professor Anita Hill about the barriers to a more diverse judiciary, whether she would take a call from Biden to consider the role and how the process has (or hasn’t) changed since the Thomas and Kavanaugh hearings. And they discuss whether cancel culture can hold the powerful accountable for their actions.

America’s Black History Month and Its Global Relevance

Heller in the News
February 22, 2022

Maria Madison shares reflections on the global importance of Black History Month in a blog post for BNID (Boston Network for International Development).

Anita Hill To Launch Weekly Podcast Ahead Of SCOTUS Pick With Malcom Gladwell’s Pushkin Industries

Heller in the News
February 22, 2022

According to Deadline, Anita Hill, a Brandeis University professor, has teamed up with Malcolm Gladwell’s Pushkin Industries to launch Getting Even with Anita Hill starting February 28, 2022.

Study: Where Kids Live Linked to Possible Delay in Surgical Care

Heller in the News
February 17, 2022

In NBC 5 Chicago, researchers used the Child Opportunity Index in a study that shows where a child lives could lead to a delay in surgical care.

The Case For Accountable Care Organizations To Partner With Geriatric Emergency Departments

Heller in the News
February 17, 2022

In their new Health Affairs Forefront article, Robert Mechanic and Kevin Biese discuss how accountable care organizations and geriatric emergency departments share a common goal: ensuring their patients are cared for in an appropriate setting.

Nearly All U.S. States Need More Naloxone to Combat Opioid Overdose Deaths

Heller in the News
February 16, 2022

The opioid-overdose antidote Naxolone can save lives by blocking the opioids' interference with breathing. Traci Green, Ph.D., director of the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University, explains that Naloxone is most effective for fatal overdose prevention when used to reverse an overdose as soon as it is recognized.

Breaking new ground in cannabis research

Heller News Release
February 15, 2022

Alexandra Kritikos, PhD’21, is pioneering new methods and data sets to uncover real-world trends among medical marijuana patients

Dr. Jill M. Baren named first woman president of Lake Forest College

Heller in the News
February 15, 2022

Jill M. Baren, MD, EMBA'19, will become Lake Forest College’s fourteenth president in July 2022.

Opioid Use on Los Angeles Angels Extended Beyond Tyler Skaggs, Trial Testimony Reveals

Heller in the News
February 15, 2022

In The Wall Street Journal, Andrew Kolodny is quoted talking about athletes struggling with opioid addiction.

Mark Cuban’s Cost Plus Drug Company offers discounted drugs, but can it change the pharmaceutical industry?

Heller in the News
February 14, 2022

In an interview for Marketplace, Cindy Parks Thomas, a health policy professor at Brandeis University, explains that the entire pharmaceutical industry is guarded and that we don’t know how much we're truly paying for any given drug. “I think generally, everybody would agree that having new entrants into the market and trying to disrupt these problematic prices is a good thing,”

Why more and more US universities are adding caste to anti-discrimination policies

Heller in the News
February 12, 2022

Laurence Simon is quoted in the Economic Times speaking about how Brandeis University added caste to its non-discrimination policy in 2019.

New study shows major shortage of naloxone in nearly every U.S. state

Heller News Release
February 11, 2022

In The Lancet Public Health journal, Professor Traci Green and coauthors identify where the life-saving opioid overdose antidote is needed most.

Caste Discrimination Exists in the U.S., Too—But a Movement to Outlaw It Is Growing

Heller in the News
February 11, 2022

In TIME, Brandeis University is mentioned as the first university to add caste to its non-discrimination policy.

Increase in naloxone accessibility needed in almost every US state to combat opioid overdoses, study says

Heller in the News
February 11, 2022

In The Hill, Traci Green is quoted speaking about how life-saving interventions such as naloxone are needed to prevent overdose deaths.

Anita Hill on ending gender harassment and violence

Heller in the News
February 11, 2022

Paulette Barnes’ legal victory in 1977 was a landmark sexual harassment case and should have mattered more and sooner, Brandeis Professor Anita Hill said, according to The Harvard Gazette.

Study shows that states need more naloxone

Heller in the News
February 10, 2022

Traci Green appears on Boston 25 News to discuss a new study that finds distribution of OD antidote naloxone needs redirection to community programs.

Child tax credit a 'lifeline' to American families

Heller in the News
February 10, 2022

Dolores Acevedo-Garcia appeared on MSNBC to discuss the benefits of extending child tax credits.

The one thing you must do to get the rest of the $3,600 Child Tax Credit

Heller in the News
February 10, 2022

On Fox 45 News in Baltimore, Dolores Acevedo-Garcia talks about why the child tax credit should be permanent.

CDC proposes new prescription Opioid guidelines for caregivers

Heller in the News
February 10, 2022

Andrew Kolodny is quoted in the Washington Post talking about the CDC's new prescription opioid guidelines for caregivers.

Camp for all

Heller in the News
February 09, 2022

In a blog for Jewish Insider, Hailey Kessler, Hornstein MA'23, from Brandeis University, explains that children with physical disabilities need to be able to attend mainstream camps with their friends and peers.

Author Q&A with Carole Carlson: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Heller News Release
February 08, 2022

MBA program director Carole Carlson's new textbook, published in February 2022 from SAGE, fills a critical gap in business school education.

How the battle to end caste bias on American campuses was fought

Heller in the News
February 07, 2022

Laurence Simon is quoted in the Times of India regarding Brandeis University's move to add caste to the Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy in 2019.

Study Finds Unexpected Benefits of ‘Drug Checking’ Programs

Heller in the News
February 07, 2022

NC State News cites a study co-authored by Traci Green that shows "drug checking" programs have unexpected benefits, allowing public health programs to reach and work with people who use drugs who would otherwise not access services such as HIV testing.

Susan M. Collins becomes first woman of color to lead Boston Federal Reserve Bank

Heller in the News
February 07, 2022

Lisa Lynch, a Brandeis University professor and former chair of the Boston Fed who led the search committee that tapped Rosengren to be president in 2007, is quoted by the Boston Globe concerning the designation of Susan M. Collins to lead the Boston Federal Reserve Bank.

We Patched Up Some Leaks, but Not the Root Causes and Effects

Heller in the News
February 07, 2022

Pierrce Holmes, MPP'22, writes for Medium about reparations for Black Americans.

Juanita High School students create diagnostic test for tuberculosis

Heller in the News
February 03, 2022

Cynthia Tschampl talks to King5 in Seattle about how tuberculosis was the leading infectious disease cause of death before COVID-19, and the lack of infrastructure and funding to protect adults from TB.

Why David Weil Is the Most Important Biden Nominee You’ve Never Heard Of

Heller in the News
February 02, 2022

The New Republic writes that David Weil's nomination is important for overtime pay, a crucial leg of the New Deal that’s vital to a robust middle class.

Black Americans’ lack of participation in the stock market likely to widen post-pandemic wealth gap

Heller in the News
February 02, 2022

Tatjana Meschede, associate director at Brandeis University's Institute on Assets and Social Policy, talks about the pandemic's impact on communities of color compared to white communities in an interview for CNBC.

Winter 2022 Heller Magazine: Letter from the Dean

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

“Across the board, Heller people impress me with their passion for their work, their academic and interpersonal integrity, and their capacity to make this complicated organization run.”

Q & A: Meet Alison Elliott, MBA/MA SID’22

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

Alison Elliott, MBA/MA SID’22, is passionate about using social entrepreneurship to promote sustainable agriculture practices.

Preserving Concord’s Black History

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

Associate Dean Maria Madison, director of the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity, brings her restorative justice expertise to The Robbins House.

Health Policy Change-Makers

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

Heller alumni are advancing health equity from every angle.

It’s a Problem So Big, We Have to Solve It

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

In a powerful new book, University Professor Anita Hill describes the true costs and consequences of gender-based violence.

Fighting for Energy Justice

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

Paula García, MA SID’13, is taking a people-first approach to solving the climate crisis.

New Nonprofit Eases Estate-Planning Process for Parents of Children with Disabilities

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

Tom Sannicandro, PhD'16, applies his expertise as an attorney and disability rights advocate to a new endeavor that helps families with children with disabilities.

Alumna Authors Book on Future of Policing in South Africa

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

In June 2021, Ziyanda Stuurman, MA SID’20, published “Can We Be Safe? The Future of Policing in South Africa,” which unpacks the complex history of policing in the country.

Celebrating a Career Built on Solving Big Public-Administration Challenges

Heller News Release
February 01, 2022

A look back on the long and distinguished career of Thomas P. Glynn III, MSW'72, PhD'77, whose many roles have included CEO of Massport and deputy secretary of labor.

Congress must deliver on bipartisan infrastructure promises to workers with these two steps

Heller in the News
January 31, 2022

An opinion piece in The Hill argues that in order for Congress to deliver on bipartisan infrastructure promises to workers, the Senate should confirm David Weil, an expert on how governments can leverage limited resources to improve compliance across the private sector.

Colleges and universities across the US are moving to ban caste discrimination

Heller in the News
January 30, 2022

In CNN, Brandeis University is mentioned as an early example of a university that added caste to their non-discrimination policies.

Federation Conversation Podcast: The Federation's Pigford Research Project with Brandeis University

Heller in the News
January 29, 2022

On the Federation Conversation podcast, Thomas M. Shapiro discusses the Pigford Research Project and the efforts to understand how Black farmer lawsuits had an impact on farmers and their families.

How to Improve the Delivery of Public Health Services Across Massachusetts

Heller in the News
January 28, 2022

A recent Massachusetts Health Policy Forum presented research-based action steps to strengthen the 351 local public health departments across the Commonwealth.

Introducing the 12 members of CT Mirror’s Community Editorial Board

Heller in the News
January 28, 2022

Sana Sheikh, PhD'20, has been named a member of CT Mirror’s inaugural Community Editorial Board.

Tenure granted to three Heller School faculty members

Heller News Release
January 27, 2022

Brandeis Board of Trustees granted tenure status to three exceptional Heller faculty members: Karen Donelan, Pamina Firchow, and Monika Mitra.

Sukia Akiba Helping Young People of Color & Minority to Create Wealth

Heller in the News
January 27, 2022

Sukia Akiba, MS'18, is featured in Vents Magazine for her work as CEO at The Soul Supplier, a financial literacy firm specializing in teaching underrepresented youth how to create generational wealth.

Rwanda Biomedical Centre Gets New Director

Heller in the News
January 27, 2022

Noella Bigirimana, MS'15, is mentioned in Taarifa for her work as the former head of research at Rwanda Biomedical Centre and as someone who is also on the board of directors of the AI Transparency Institute and the Youth Combating Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Mass General Brigham required to rein in costs, Health Policy Commission says

Heller in the News
January 25, 2022

Stuart Altman is quoted in WBUR talking about the prominence and rate of growth of Massachusetts General Brigham.

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page fills three top jobs, including chief of staff

Heller in the News
January 25, 2022

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Cal Harris, MPP'10, has been named chief of staff to St. Louis County Executive Sam Page.

HPC reins in Mass General Brigham

Heller in the News
January 25, 2022

Health Policy Commission Chair Stuart Altman is quoted in CommonWealth Magazine saying Mass General Brigham has a spending problem.

This Valuable Data Tool Informs Policies that Shape Child Opportunity

Heller in the News
January 25, 2022

Dolores Acevedo-Garcia writes for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health Blog about how the Child Opportunity Index can help build a brighter, more equitable future for all children.

#MyDisabledLifeIsWorthy highlights disability community's pandemic frustrations: 'We are seen as collateral damage'

Heller in the News
January 23, 2022

Robyn Powell, PhD'20, tells Yahoo! that the ongoing pandemic response has abandoned rather than protected the most vulnerable, with inconsistent health measures and “everybody for themselves” mindsets.

What the Child Tax Credit fight says about America

Heller in the News
January 22, 2022

In The Hill, Professor Dolores Acevedo-Garcia and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President Richard Besser argue for a permanent and more equitable expansion of the Child Tax Credit.

Students Demand Biden Keep Campaign Promise To Cancel Loan Debt

Heller in the News
January 21, 2022

BlackAmericaWeb.com cites a report from the Institute for Economic and Racial Equality on how Black student loan borrowers still owe 95 percent of their cumulative borrowing total after 20 years, compared with only 6 percent owed by white borrowers.

These movies, shows and documentaries should be watched during Black History Month

Heller in the News
January 21, 2022

Texas News Today suggests watching the documentary "Anita" as part of its recommendations for shows and documentaries for Black History Month.

Remembering Marty Krauss

Heller News Release
January 19, 2022

A Brandeis 'lifer,' Professor Emerita Marty Krauss spent her entire career at Heller and Brandeis, serving as a faculty member and researcher before assuming key leadership roles including university provost and interim Heller dean.

Institute for Economic and Racial Equity receives $1 million gift to establish Racial Justice x Tech Policy initiative

Heller News Release
January 18, 2022

The two-year provisional gift from the Kapor Center will build student and faculty capacity and establish a research prize on racial bias in tech.

Coalition Of Labor Unions Urges Biden To Cancel Student Debt Immediately

Heller in the News
January 18, 2022

The Shoestring references research from the Institute for Economic and Racial Equity that shows student loan debt disproportionately affects Black borrowers.

Ohio doctors, pharmacists cut back on the dispensing of prescription opioids in 2021, continuing a yearslong trend

Heller in the News
January 17, 2022

Dr. Andrew Kolodny is quoted in Cleveland.com saying that prescribing opioids is trending in the right direction.

Anita Hill on gender violence: ‘Race layers on top of the misogyny’

Heller in the News
January 17, 2022

Anita Hill speaks to KCRW on how we can't ignore race when addressing the problem of gender violence.

Spillover From Biden’s $15 Contractor Wage Hike? Experts Differ

Heller in the News
January 14, 2022

Clemens Noelke is quoted in Bloomberg Law speaking about research that shows minimum wage increases at companies like Amazon and Target spur competitors to follow suit.

Student loans worsen racial inequalities in America

Heller in the News
January 12, 2022

KATC cites research from IERE that shows how student loan debt has a disproportionate burden on Black borrowers compared to white borrowers.

Watch Finding Your Roots: Activist Roots

Heller in the News
January 11, 2022

Anita Hill appears on an episode of PBS's Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Anita Hill hits genealogy 'lottery' on 'Finding Your Roots'

Heller in the News
January 10, 2022

NBC News reports that in a new episode of the PBS series, Anita Hill found an ancestor listed in the U.S. census at a time when Black people were rarely documented by name.

MSU study shows nursing labor market tightened, wages rose during first 15 months of pandemic

Heller in the News
January 09, 2022

In KBZK, a new study coauthored by Karen Donelan provides evidence that the labor market tightened for the nursing workforce throughout the first 15 months of the COVID-19 pandemic.

FINDING YOUR ROOTS: Activists Roots

Heller in the News
January 07, 2022

KPBS shares that Anita Hill will be on an episode of FINDING YOUR ROOTS that helps activists discover their ancestors.

Biden Renominates Wage Chief After Senate Delay

Heller in the News
January 05, 2022

Law 360 reports that President Joe Biden renominated David Weil to lead the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division after the Senate failed to confirm an initial nomination of Weil before its last session ended.

Nurse employment a sketchy future, remains 10% below pre-pandemic levels at skilled care facilities: study

Heller in the News
January 05, 2022

McNights Long-Term Care News reports on a study, coauthored by Karen Donelan, that shows nursing home employment remains 13.2% lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic.

New study shows nursing labor market tightened, wages rose during first 15 months of pandemic

Heller in the News
January 04, 2022

The study, coauthored by Karen Donelan and published in Health Affairs, showed that the nursing labor market tightened over the first 15 months of the pandemic.

Mediation: Negotiation by Other Moves with Alain Lempereur

Heller in the News
May 06, 2021

In this book talk, author Alain Lempereur discusses his book Mediation: Negotiation by Other Moves. The book provides mediators, parties and other stakeholders with a powerful and thorough overview of how mediation succeeds. Its methodology elucidates grounding principles, real cases, concrete skills to reinforce and practical formulas to use, according to Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation.