Schneider Institute Researchers Host International Workshop to Analyze Data from Dengue Fever Studies

April 28, 2006

Donald Shepard, Ph.D., and Jose Suaya, M.D., Ph.D. '06, of Heller's Schneider Institute for Health Policy organized an international workshop that was held from Monday, May 1 through Friday, May 5 on the Brandeis campus.  

The researchers have been studying the epidemiologic and socioeconomic impact of dengue fever on patients, households, medical providers, and governments in their respective countries. The main objective of the workshop is to analyze the data collected in these studies, which have been sponsored by the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI).

"With increasing urbanization, dengue is a growing public health threat in tropical countries," Dr. Shepard said. "The research is showing that expenditures on medical treatment are only part of the economic burden. When lost work time, school absenteeism, travel expense in obtaining care and supporting patients are factored in, the burden mutiplies."

Participating researchers included Drs. Joao Siqueira and Celina Turchi Martelli from Brazil; Drs. Romeo Montoya Acevedo and Rafael Chacon from El Salvador; Drs. Leticia Castillo Signor and Carlos Ovando from Guatemala; Drs. Blas Armien and Evelia Quiroz from Panama; and Dr. Fatima Garrido from Venezuela.

Dr. Shepard and Dr. Suaya, along with Schneider Institute researchers Mariana Caram and Clare Hurley, make up the Program Management Team of the PDVI-sponsored studies. The Program Management Team has been providing technical assistance to the researchers during all the research steps, including proposal development, study design, implementation, and analysis.

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