The Opioid Policy Research Collaborative (OPRC), based in the Institute for Behavioral Health (IBH) of the Schneider Institutes for Health Policy at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management, is advancing desperately needed scholarship on interventions to address the opioid addiction epidemic. We serve as a primary resource for state and federal health officials, policymakers and private organizations and play prominent roles in four key areas:

  • Providing Cutting-Edge Research: OPRC generates research to objectively evaluate local, state and national interventions and policies that have been implemented in response to the opioid crisis.
  • Offering Innovative Policy Initiatives: OPRC develops evidence-based guidance and recommendations for a wide range of stakeholders, including federal, state and local government agencies, health care systems, and industry.
  • Serving as a Convener and Collaborator: OPRC brings together researchers, clinicians and policymakers from diverse disciplines to develop coordinated strategies for responding to the opioid addiction epidemic. The Collaborative creates opportunities for university faculty to collaborate with other top researchers in the fields of public health, health services research, epidemiology, addiction treatment, medical education and drug policy. 
  • Communicating Activities, Outcomes and Accomplishments: OPRC shares findings from innovative research and policy initiatives across academic, medical, nonprofit and government fields. OPRC works closely with media outlets to highlight key accomplishments for an even wider audience.
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Taking Aim at America's Opioid Crisis: How OPRC Researchers Are Pointing Policymakers in a More Effective Direction

Read the Heller Magazine article

OPRC in the News

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Vox

How to stop the deadliest drug overdose crisis in American history

Teenage heroin abuser

CNN

Teen drug overdose death rate climbed 19% in one year

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Healthline

A ‘national emergency’ declaration on opioid epidemic might actually work