Amartya Sen to speak at 2012 Heller commencement

March 29, 2012

The Heller School's commencement speaker on May 20 will be Professor Amartya Sen of Harvard University, Dean Lisa Lynch announced today. Amartya Sen is an economist and philosopher who received a Nobel Prize in 1998 for his contributions to the theory of social justice and the field of welfare economics. Professor Sen is best known for his work on the causes of famine and for having helped develop the theory of social choice. Born in India, Professor Sen’s numerous publications, including “Collective Choice,” “On Economic Inequality,” “On Ethics and Economics” and “Development as Freedom,” have been translated into dozens of languages. Currently the Lamont University Professor at Harvard University, Professor Sen has previously taught at such institutions as MIT, the University of Oxford, Delhi University and the London School of Economics, where Dean Lynch was one of his students. He received degrees at the University of Calcutta and Cambridge University. This year, Sen was awarded the National Humanities Medal.

Professor Sen will also be receiving an honorary degree from Brandeis on May 20. Read about all of this year's honorary degree recipients here.

In addition to Professor Sen's address, the Heller commencement will also feature student speakers from each of Heller's degree programs.

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